How to Care for Cypress Wood Fences

In addition to making an attractive addition to your home’s landscape, a cypress fence is also a wise option. The timber naturally creates a preservative called cypressene, making its heartwood resistant to corrosion, decay and insects. After a few years of exposure to the components, your cypress fencing can turn an unattractive shade of dark gray or become covered with mould and moss. No matter the circumstance, properly caring for your cypress fence will reestablish its appearance and protect it from salt spray, rain and whatever else Mother Nature throws at it.

Attach a 25-degree tip to a power washer wand before hooking up the unit to your garden hose. Standing at least 18 inches away from the fence, move the energy washer wand up the duration of each plank to get rid of any dirt or debris. Avoid lingering on almost any place to reduce harm or gouging.

Wear rubber gloves to make a mixture of 1 cup household bleach and 1 gallon water in a plastic bucket. Dip a plastic scrub brush into the mix and use it to kill any mold or mould on the fence. Rinse the bleach solution away completely with a garden hose. Permit the fence to dry thoroughly before continuing.

Look carefully at the cypress fencing and fix any loose planks with stainless steel screws or cracks using wood adhesive. Permit the glue to dry for at least 24 hours prior to continuing.

Employ a water-repellent sealant to your cypress fence using a paintbrush or roller. Working in 3-foot segments, apply the product using back and forth motions. Shield the cypress even further using a product which also contains a moisture inhibitor and mildewcide.

Reapply the water-repellent sealant every one or two decades.

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How to Refinish Wood Spindles

Turned spindles are typical on antique chairs, cabinets, bed frames and staircases, and also an effective method of stripping and sanding them is required knowledge for any refinisher wanting to produce quality work. Conventional palm sanders do not reach into crevices, and if you overwork one, you’ll wind up changing the form of the attribute. Hand sanding is a less aggressive approach, but it is time consuming and does not always work, particularly when you’re attempting to get rid of a dark stain. A more prudent strategy uses chemicals to remove as much stain and finish as possible and keeps sanding to a minimum.

Apply paint stripper to the spindle, either having an old paintbrush or by spraying it from an aerosol can. Spraying the stripper will ensure it gets into all the crevices.

Let the stripper work for 10 to 20 minutes, and before it dries out, scrape it off with a wire brush. Work the brush into all the crevices, but do not push too hard or you’ll scrape the wood.

Apply another coat of stripper to crevices and features that nevertheless seem dim. Let it work, then rub it off with fine steel wool. Do not forget to wear rubber gloves as you do this to protect your palms.

Soak the steel wool into lacquer thinner and use it to completely moisturize the spindle down. It’ll remove flecks of complete that remain on the outside, and may get rid of some stain. If you used a solvent-based stripper, the lacquer thinner will neutralize it, but if you used a water-based stripper, wash off the spindle with water afterwards massaging with lacquer thinner.

Bleach out the stain if you plan to use a lighter stain than the one already on the timber, or you want to leave the timber unstained. There different types of bleach, and also the top one to use depends on the kind of stain you’re trying to remove.

Mix a saturated solution of sterile calcium hypochlorite, available from a swimming pool supplier, and water to remove dyed stains. Brush the remedy on, let it work overnight and wash it off with water. The active ingredient in this mix is chlorine, so wear gloves and a respirator when working with it.

Use oxalic acid to lighten any spots which are the result of natural wood discoloration, which are common on antiques. Mix the oxalic acid crystals with water in accordance with the instructions on the container, brush the solution on and let it work overnight before washing it off with water.

Sand deep crevices carefully with a rotary tool and a flapwheel or abrasive brush accessory. Work the tool into the crevice, but use mild pressure so that you don’t alter the form of the spindle.

Sand the entire spindle by hand with 150-grit sandpaper when you’re happy with its appearance and it’s completely dried. If you’re staining, wipe the stain on with a rag.

Spray sanding sealer on the spindle either having an air rifle or an aerosol can. Let it dry, then sand lightly with 220-grit sandpaper. Apply a few clear end coats by spraying, sanding every coating lightly with 220 or finer paper after it dries and before implementing the next. Do not sand the last coat.

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What Everyday Items Can Be Used to Clean Wood Kitchen Cabinets?

Wood kitchen cabinets are prone to all sorts of dirt, dirt and gunk simply out of being in the kitchen. Steam residue greasy residue on overhead cabinets, and when your 6-year-old insists on helping with the recipe, then your handheld mixer sprays cake batter everywhere. Harsh cleaners may harm the finish on wood cabinets, along with the compounds used to make the cleaners might be toxic too. As opposed to resorting to potentially toxic cleaning materials, whip up your own all-natural cleaning solutions. You most likely already have the items you require, like vinegar or baking soda, available in your kitchen.

Basic Cleaner

Vinegar in a squirt bottle serves as spray cleaner for wood kitchen cabinets. Spray the cabinets, then wash them down with a slightly damp sponge after a minute or 2. Vinegar helps cut grease and greasy film that builds up near cooking areas; it also removes odors. If the cabinets do not feel grimy or greasy, then the vinegar in the spray bottle can be diluted with an equal amount of water. A natural dish soap or oil soap produced out of plant-based materials may be used instead of vinegar; combine a few squirts of this soap to a bowl of water, wipe the cabinets down, then wash again with a new damp sponge. Add a few drops of vinegar into the soapy water if the cabinets feel oily. Dry cabinets with a soft cloth.

Stubborn Spots

Remove built-up dirt or food debris by mixing salt and vinegar into a paste. Scrub the issue regions with a toothbrush or microfiber cloth; prevent harsh abrasives like steel wool, since these can scratch the finish or the wood itself. Hold a cloth or sponge dipped in vinegar over a stubborn spot if it still remains after scrubbingthen scrub it again with all the salt-and-vinegar paste. Baking soda onto a damp sponge might be used as well.

Hardened Gooey Foods

Eliminate dried gooey materials like maple syrup, honey or chocolate with a few ice cubes placed in a refrigerated sandwich tote. Hold the bag of ice within the issue spot for several minutes or till the material hardens. Scrape the material away with the advantage of a plastic knife, bowl of a plastic spoon, or a sheet of card stock. Wipe away any remaining residue by spraying it with vinegar, or mixing a paste of salt and vinegar, then scrubbing the spot gently with a toothbrush.

Clean and Protect

Keep wood cabinets looking their best by mixing a vegetable oil like olive oil and vinegar; use equivalent portions if the cabinets are grimy, or use three components oil, 1 part vinegar when the cabinets have lately been cleaned. Apply a thin layer of this mix over the cabinets, massaging it in with a soft, dye-free cloth. Employing a dye-free cloth ensures the cloth color won’t bleed onto the cabinets.

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How Do I Care for an External Macrame Plant Hanger?

Macrame plant hangers add some classic charm and appeal to any outdoor area. Produced from braided cords in various materials, colors and fashions, the macrame hangers offer durability and strength for your potted plants, and their layouts can match virtually any decor. They don’t need care aside from occasional cleaning — exposure to dust, soil, water and other materials can dull the substance’s appearance. It’s possible to clean macrame plant holders without causing any harm, but don’t use the washing machine or harsh chemicals, which may fade and weaken the substance.

Remove the pot.

Fill a bucket or sink with water that is cool. Add about 1 teaspoon of liquid laundry detergent each 1/2 gallon of water. Don’t use in case your macrame is colored, laundry detergent which contains bleach.

Place the macrame plant holder from the water and agitate it gently with your hands to remove as much dust and dirt as possible. If it’s stained, then let it soak for about 20 or 30 minutes before agitating again.

Drain the water out of bucket or the sink and wash it.

Agitate and swish the macrame plant holder to wash out any detergent residue.

Drain the water out of bucket or the sink. Squeeze out any excess water out of the plant holder. Hang it up in a well-ventilated region to air dry before rehanging the plant.

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How to Use Hot Water for Weed Control

Weeds instantly multiply, building a landscape look sloppy and stealing nutrients from desirable plants. Chemical weedkillers are an option to eliminate weeds, but their potential for negative environmental and health consequences leads several homeowners to seek natural options. The boiling water treatment is inexpensive and successful in burning weeds. Hot water works better on broad-leaf weeds than it will on established perennials, woody plants and grass, based on University of California Integrated Pest Management Online.

Dress in a shirt long pants, socks and closed-toed shoes. The clothing will help to protect your skin if you are splashed onto by the water.

Identify the weeds you plan to kill using the water method. Pick weeds that aren’t near plants that you need to call home. When the boiling water strikes a plant, that plant probably will die. Boiling water works well on weeds along sidewalks and drives, away from other crops.

Fill in a teakettle. Heat the water on a stove burner comes. The water needs to be greater than 200 F, based on University of California Integrated Pest Management Online.

Place an oven mitt or glove in your hand. Switch the stove burner off, and remove the teakettle. Carry the teakettle carefully although instantly to the weeds that you want to kill. Don’t waste time getting to the weeds since the water temperature drops quickly.

Hold the teakettle’s spout near the weeds to get the best control of the water, and then pour the boiling water directly onto the weeds. Pour doesn’t splash.

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Sealing Old Exterior Concrete

The building material is not good at resisting marks and stains as it ages, although concrete is durable and long-lasting with no specific treatment. Adding a protective seal to coat your concrete-based projects can help prevent stains from engine oil dirt, mildew and other fluids.

All Sealed Up

Make any necessary repairs, like smoothing rough spots, filling cracks or repairing weathered segments before sealing the concrete surface. Before applying a new one, if the older concrete has been sealed, the sealant should be stripped. Whether it has been sealed it has to be cleaned thoroughly prior to sealing or dirt, any stains and dirt will be trapped beneath the sealant. You can force use trisodium phosphate and a clean brush to remove stains, or wash off the concrete. Rinse the surface well and allow it to dry before using the sealer. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for spraying or dispersing the sealant. The sealer in coats, allowing it to dry between each coat.

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The Way to Spray Paint Cabinet Hardware

Durable closet hardware is well worth keeping even if its finish is outdated or no longer matches the decor of the room. Rather than settling for hardware in its present less-than-attractive condition or completely replacing every knob or pull when repainting cabinets, give that cupboard hardware a makeover of its own with spray paint. Spray paint leaves a smoother finish than brushing the paint, as the spray travels around curves and into particulars without leaving brush lines about the hardware.

Clean out the hardware thoroughly using a vacuum cleaner and moist sponge which has a nylon scrub pad. Wipe away the cleaner with a damp sponge, then dry the hardware with paper towels.

Cover the work area with paper. Sand each hardware bit to scuff the paint or complete, which makes it increasingly receptive to paint. This is important if the hardware is made from metal, plastic or wood. Wipe away the dust with a soft fabric.

Set the cupboard hardware atop a bit of scrap corrugated cardboard or shipping foam. If the hardware has a screw backing such as a drawer pull, push the end of the screw through the cardboard or foam so the pull sits erect.

Don a face mask and ventilate the region. Shake the spray primer can for a moment or as directed by the can’s instructions. Prime each piece of hardware by spraying it with smooth, even strokes, holding the can 12 to 18 inches away. Allow the primer to dry completely.

Shake the spray paint may as indicated from the paint instructions. Paint each bit of hardware in the same manner as applying the primer, using smooth, slow strokes, overlapping each marginally for a comprehensive application. Enable the paint to dry completely. Apply a second coat if the finish appears uneven in any areas, allowing it to dry also.

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How to Remove From Wooden Furniture

Cigarette butt or an errant ash that overlooks the ashtray may cause a burn mark. In some cases, cigarette burns may have been there a while, such as on furniture you purchased secondhand from a thrift store or yard sale. These unsightly burn marks are deep, damaging the finish instead of the wood itself. At times, the cause of the problem is also a part of the treatment: Cigarette ash is a key ingredient in a rub that removes burn marks from timber.

Wipe the area that is damaged using a damp sponge to wash the wood and remove any ashes left behind. Wipe again with a dry cloth.

Place a little bit of wood or smoke ash ash in a shallow bowl. Add just enough mineral oil or linseed oil to create a paste, mixing it with a toothpick or a spoon.

Wrap a soft white fabric and dip your finger into the paste mix that is greasy — instead of a fabric ensures no dye will transfer to the timber using white. Rub the mixture over the burn mark, after the grain, until the wake disappears. Wipe the material from time with another part of the fabric. When the mark fades, wipe away it completely with a corner of the fabric.

Pour a little linseed or mineral oil. Rub the oil over the burned area, after the timber grain. Permit the oil to sit down for a few minutes, and then wipe off excess with a section of the fabric.

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How to Clean an Antique Wood Table & Chairs Without Damaging Them

Antique wood furniture ages differently depending upon its own history and environment, resulting in one-of-a-kind objects that make for great conversation pieces for your home. If your dining table and chairs are worn that the end is excessively damaged, it is best to consult a conservation professional about how to move in restoring and cleaning it, because a first finish is a significant part of the value of a antique furniture pieces. But if the end is intact or only slightly worn, then the pieces likely only need to be washed to remove stains and dirt.

Dust Away

The first step to cleaning antique wood furniture will be to quietly remove any dust that has built upon its surfaces. To prevent scraping the wood, use a vacuum cleaner with a soft brush attachment for hard-to-reach surfaces or crevices, like the table and chair legs, or simply use a handheld soft brush or very soft fabric for your bigger surfaces.

Strike Dirt

So long as the finish to the wood is still in good shape, you can use a diluted soap on almost any regions of the table and chairs with heavy levels of dirt accumulation or water-soluble stains. Dilute a household detergent or, better yet, a conservation-grade furniture detergent with water, in a ratio of approximately 1 teaspoon of soap each pint of water. Apply a soft cloth that’s been dampened with the solution to the surface of the wood. Rinse with another soft cloth dampened with distilled water. Be careful not to use too much water, since this can stain and damage the wood.

Go to the Grime

Oil-based stains like fingerprints, and oily dirt and grime from past uses of wax, can accumulate in a wood piece’s finish. If these stains are evident in your piece, they can be attached with paint thinner, or mineral spirits. Dampen a soft cloth with a small amount of paint thinner and analyze a very small affected area to make sure that it does not have a negative reaction to the finish. Otherwise, clean all affected regions. If wood does react badly into the paint thinner, consult a conservation professional to determine the best method of cleaning.

Waxy Complete

After cleaning, applying a high-quality furniture wax into your pieces will protect them from further harm without disturbing the original finish. Place a small amount of wax onto a soft cloth and rub in a circular motion; change fabrics often. Choose a mild or clear wax for light finishes. Pick a dark wax for darker finishes to steer clear of sesame or marks.

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Celosia Types

Celosia comprises a group of plants, bearing vividly-colored blossom heads, and growing as annuals at U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 2 through 9 and as perennials in zones 10 through 12. Celosia varieties are available in many sizes, from just a few inches up to about 5 feet high. Plants require little upkeep, thriving in drought and heat. Celosia plants are grouped into three classes: a crested type (Celosia cristata), a plume type (Celosia plumosa) and a spike or wheat type (Celosia spicata).

Crested Type

The flower heads of crested celosia (Celosia cristata), also called cockscomb celosia, resemble the structures of a mind, while some of the narrower flower heads seem like a rooster’s comb. An example of a crested celosia is “Toreador” (Celosia cristata “Toreador”), which rises 18 to 20 inches tall and has a bright red 12-inch blossom head. The “Chief Series” (Celosia cristata “Chief Series”) is a mixture of 40-inch tall plants with flower heads up to 7 inches across in brilliant colors of dark red, carmine, gold, rose or red and yellow bi-color.

Plume Type

The flower heads of plume type celosia (Celosia plumosa) are soft, velvety and feathery. Plants , when young, can also create side effects. The plumes come in cream, bright yellow, orange or red, depending on variety. “Sylphid” (Celosia plumosa “Sylphid”) is a 30- to 40-inch plant using green-yellow plumes, while “Apricot Brandy” (Celosia plumosa “Apricot Brandy”) is a 6- to 12-inch plant using reddish-purple leaves and apricot-orange plumes.

Spike Type

Spike celosia (Celosia spicata) can also be called wheat celosia, because its flower heads resemble heads of wheat. This type of celosia looks almost like a shrub, because each plant produces many flower stalks. Flower heads are smaller and blossom colors are muted in contrast to another celosia types. “Flamingo Feathers” (Celosia spicata “Flamingo Feathers”) is a well-branched plant using rose-pink flowers, growing to 4 or 3 feet tall. The “Bright Spears Mix” (Celosia spicata “Glowing Spears Mix”) consists of 24- to 30- inch plants with pink, white and dark red flower heads.

Growing Celosia

Grow celosia plants by placing seeds directly into the ground. However, in regions with long winters, start seeds indoors or buy nursery plants. Celosia wants a soil temperature of 60 degrees F to germinate and grow. Any sort of soil, such as clay or sandy loam, is suitable. All types of celosia prefer a sunny place, but mild shade is acceptable. All varieties of celosia boom in heat and bear drought, once established. Combined with other plants, the smaller celosia varieties also make attractive container plants. Celosia lasts for a very long time as a cut flower, and when dried, is a beautiful accent in a dry flower arrangement.

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